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AT&T Building

450px-Sony_Building_by_David_Shankbone

The AT&T Building, or otherwise known as the Sony Tower, rests in Midtown Manhattan and is considered an easily recognizable landmark of New York City as well as a controversial design by architect Philip Johnson.
Maybe controversial isn’t really the greatest description of AT&T, it’s more like criticized. Mainly for its decorative top which bears a similar resemblance to mid-1700s Chippendale furniture. Aside from its classic “cabinet” look, the Sony Tower is considered a key example of postmodern architecture.
AT&T was completed in 1984 and occupied by its namesake up until 1992 and changed hands to Sony. Sony Tower, or Sony Building, rises 647 feet with 37 d5145152l floors and is located 560 Madison Ave. at 56th street. A great attribute this skyscraper displays is its 7-story massive entrance. Also, another cool fact about the AT&T Building is that the pinkish granite used for its exterior originates from the same quarry that supplied the façade for the Grand Central Terminal.
AT&T is also one of the first “new era” replica buildings we (InFocusTech) produced.
“New Era” of replicas just means we moved away from manually gluing plastic strips and etched metal panels onto balsa wood and into a CNC/laser engraving method of replication. AT&T building This model stands 5-1/4 inches tall. There is no real scale to AT&T, but sometime down the road we’ll get a scale (1 inch = 150 feet) model completed and maybe even a larger one in the 100-foot scale. The AT&T Building was a giant stepping-stone in the evolution of replica buildings for InFocusTech.
The AT&T Building might not be one of the tallest skyscrapers in New York, but it does stand out and was designed by an icon in American architecture, Philip Johnson. We replicated this building pretty much for those same reasons and hopefully this little post will shed some light on the actual building and it smaller counterpart.

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